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  • Photo by Petra Collins

  • Photo by Petra Collins

  • “Literally Bye” exhibition by Petra Collins and André Saraiva

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Petra Collins and André Saraiva team up for “Literally Bye” exhibition in Miami

Petra Collins, the Canadian photographer that is known for her collaborations with Purple and Rookie magazine, as well as for her infamous T-shirts for American Apparel, and André Saraiva, the celebrated Paris-based artist that has revolutionized the international street art scene, presented during Miami Art Basel a two-day co-curated exhibition, titled “Literally Bye”. The exhibition featured artworks by Mayan Toledano, Julia Baylis, Carlotta Kohl and Kristie Muller, as well as a selection of Collins’ personal works, all representing a young generation of female artists that try to find their voice in a male dominated society, questioning the constant need for male validation.

“Literally Bye”, which was presented at the Standard Spa in Miami Beach, was accompanied by a stunning performance by artist Alexandra Marzella that involved her lying in a bed just in her underwear and in front of a neon installation that wrote “Wish u weren’t here”, surrounded by fellow models that were constantly filming her with their cameras. Last, but not least, the exhibition also marked the release of Petra Collins’ “Discharge” photographic book that presents “images of self-discovery and femininity that explore the emotional, complex intersection of life online and off”. The book aims to examine the lines between the private and the public, serving as a document of the artist’s daily life and touching themes like censorship in the mass media or female body image and social pressure.