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  • “Tape Paris” installation by COS and Numen/For Use at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris

  • “Tape Paris” installation by COS and Numen/For Use at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris

  • “Tape Paris” installation by COS and Numen/For Use at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris

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  1. […] HGIssue “Tape Paris” installation by COS and Numen/For Use at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris HGIssue Swedish brand COS teamed up with Berlin-based art collective Numen/For Use for an interactive installation at the Palais de Tokyo, made entirely of…  […]

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“Tape Paris” installation by COS and Numen/For Use at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris

Swedish brand COS teamed up with Berlin-based art collective Numen/For Use for an interactive installation at the Palais de Tokyo, made entirely of 44km of clear plastic tape. The installation, titled “Tape Paris”, evokes a gigantic tunnel that represents physical and psychological interiority, and forms part of “Inside”, a group exhibition by more than 30 artists that aims to offer visitors a passage to the interior of the self. Numen/For Use wanted to transform the entrance of Palais de Tokyo into a vivid mind/body organism that “marks the entry point to a new experience” and serves as the perfect introduction to the exhibition.

Twelve people worked during ten days in order to give form to the 6-meter height installation that spreads over 5km through the gallery space and can hold up to five bodies at a time. Utterly familiar, yet surprisingly uncanny, “Tape Paris” is the perfect conjunction of the organic and the artificial, a temporary monument to the endless exploration of the body and the soul. Both “Tape Paris” installation and “Inside” exhibition will be on view until January 11, 2015, at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris.