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  • Iris Van Herpen s/s 2015

  • Iris Van Herpen s/s 2015

  • Iris Van Herpen s/s 2015

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  1. […] The Magnetic Motion of Iris Van Herpen Exploring the boundaries between nature and technology, Van Herpen collabourated on this occasion with Canadian architect Philip Beeslay, whose works incorporate synthetic biology, advanced computation and mechatronics engineering, as well as with Dutch … Read more on HGIssue […]

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The Magnetic Motion of Iris Van Herpen

For s/s 2015, Iris Van Herpen continues her exploration of how technological advances can be employed in fashion, combining forward-thinking design and functionality. Van Herpen was inspired by a recent visit at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, which is the second-biggest magnetic field on Earth, and created an entire collection, titled “Magnetic Motion”, which pays tribute to the intermolecular forces of attraction and repulsion. Exploring the boundaries between nature and technology, Van Herpen collaborated on this occasion with Canadian architect Philip Beeslay, whose works incorporate synthetic biology, advanced computation and mechatronics engineering, as well as with Dutch artist Jolan Van Der Wiel, who uses magnetic tension in order to give new forms to her sculptures and installations.

“I find beauty in the continual shaping of Chaos that clearly embodies the primordial power of nature’s performance,” said Van Herpen, who created for her s/s 2015 collection a series of one-of-a-kind shoes, belts, necklaces and clutches that were “grown” using magnetic fields. Techniques like laser cutting, injection molding, 3-D printing and elaborate architectural handwork were employed on cocktail dresses, skirts, jackets and trousers, with micro webs of lace creating a glow effect and triacetate feathers accentuating the soft drapes and volumes of the collection.

The color palette stayed minimal in black, white, midnight blue and nude, giving space to the complex structures and dynamic shapes of the outfits, with a spectacular bell-shaped crystal dress being the perfect example. “To visualize something invisible, that is my ongoing fascination,” said the designer after the show, leaving everyone fascinated by her extraordinary capacity to combine technology with natural phenomena and turn complex ideas into intricate but wearable designs.